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CONSERVATION

For a comprehensive guideline to the atoll, download a printable version of the official Investors’ Memorandum below.

DOWNLOAD MEMORANDUM

Sustainability

Potential investors or purchasers are invited to participate in the conservation and protection of these magnificent islands. The plan is to create an exclusive, sustainable, eco-travel destination and Marine Protected Area. By supporting and investing in the local community and creating a sustainable business, the owner’s aim is to generate a source of income that will allow the local communities to support themselves without resorting to unsustainable practices. We hope to attract exclusive buyers because of our superior commitment to preserving the reef and surrounding marine life, the luxuriousness of the development, the ability of owners to invest in the underlying land and properties, and the ease and security of ownership. We will insist on the highest levels of quality in our building materials, design, marketing strategies, and construction of the buildings, in order to deliver on our promises to our equity-holders, both short-term and long-term.

Terrestrial

A large portion of the atoll lies under a canopy of non-native coconut palm. The Conflict Islands were leased to Sir Henry Wickham in 1895 who immediately started planting coconuts. After World War II more intensive coconut planting was completed, with the accompanying removal of virtually all existing tropical vegetation. When the atoll was purchased by Lu and Mary Ann Nevels in 1977 the majority of the islands had been converted to coconut plantations. Aerial images from that date show complete destruction of all other vegetation and coconuts planted in rows. When copra production ceased after 1978 the copra plantation was quickly overtaken by She Oak trees (Casuarina oligodon). Now only very small remnants of the original habitat remain. The casuarinas can gradually be reduced, and a mix of native vegetation replanted.

Marine

The Conflict Islands have the highest biodiversity recorded within the Coral Triangle. Spanning the marine waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor-Leste, the Coral Triangle is the global epicentre of marine biodiversity. This magnificent area, often called the “Amazon of the Seas,” contains nearly 30 percent of the world’s coral reefs and 75 percent of all known coral species, and is home to over 500 species of reef-building corals and 3,000 species of fish and threatened marine species such as sea turtles.

1,039 species of fish and 637 species of molluscs were recorded at The Conflict Islands (Werner, and Allen, 1998) along with 362 species of hard coral (Veron 1997) with a live coral cover of up to 83%. The average coral coverage over 40% is common. In comparison, the average reef-wide cover on the Great Barrier Reef was estimated at 23% in 2000.

The Conflict Islands were found to have the greatest concentration of fish species, with an average of 220 species recorded per dive. Irai Island, has been found to have the second best coral in the world with the largest number of species noted in a single dive.

Because of their world-class coral reefs The Conflict Islands have been proposed by Papua New Guinea as a possible World Heritage Site …
“In Conflict and Lunn Islands, where the Rapid Biodiversity Assessment was conducted during 1997, biological the reefs have extensive areas of coral coverage, very high species diversity with an average of 220 species of fish per site compared to the Great Barrier Reef and other species new to science. All of these reefs are in pristine environmental condition with no effect of destructive fishing practices such as dynamite fishing, cyanide as well as coral bleaching within the coral triangle. The Conflict Group together with Bramble Haven, Lunn Island and Jormard Island are favourable Green, loggerhead and Hawksbill Turtles nesting and breeding sites, habitats for migratory marine and shore birds nesting sites, as well as for all giant clam species. The Conflict Group of Islands is currently targeted under the Community Based Coastal and Marine Conservation Programme for the province as a Marine Protected Area (MPAs).”

Social-Responsibility

The natural resources available at The Conflict Islands present the perfect opportunity to move towards a 100% complete renewable energy system. Apart from the immediate local environmental benefits, powering the islands from renewable sources will also allow us to meet our social goals. Most importantly, The Conflict Islands could serve as a case study to show the Papua New Guinea government and local communities that these technologies are cost effective, self-sustainable, and can be implemented thoughtfully to preserve the beautiful landscape of the Louisiade Islands.

We will install low-carbon energy microgrid, consisting of Japanese-made photovoltaic solar cells, wind turbines, Coconut Bio-Diesel Generators, linked to a Sundaya energy storage and distribution system or hydrogen fuel cells for energy storage which negates the problems of lithium batteries.
A Bio-Diesel generator, fuelled by Coconut Bio-Diesel, will be potentially be used as an ecologically and cost-effective fuel supply for power generation to the project. Coconut bio-diesel is an incredible alternative to fossil fuels, and provides the following benefits …

  • Provides sustainable, ecological income to surrounding communities
  • Reduces reliance on imported fossil fuel
  • Produces small scale local electrification
  • Increases local employment
  • Reduces carbon emissions

OPPORTUNITIES

For a comprehensive guideline to the atoll, download a printable version of the official Investors’ Memorandum below.

DOWNLOAD MEMORANDUM

Eco-Tourism

Papua New Guinea is one of the world’s least explored countries, both culturally and geographically, and many undiscovered species of plants and animals are thought to exist in the interior and the country’s surrounding islands.

Strong growth in Papua New Guinea mining and resource sector has led it to become the sixth fastest-growing economy in the world as of 2011. The Papua New Guinea Constitution expresses the wish for “traditional villages and communities to remain as viable units of Papua New Guinean society” and for active steps to be taken in their preservation.

Papua New Guinea is ‘’The Last Frontier” of tourism in South-East Asia. The fact that great areas of Papua New Guinea are virtually untouched constitutes a lure for the growing numbers of international tourists looking for a combination of the unusual, “off the beaten track” places, opportunities for adventure, and access to authentic local cultures. The government has targeted tourism as a priority area for the economic development of the country and for the creation of employment opportunities at rural and urban levels.

Incentives

According to The PNG Chamber of Commerce and Industry tax incentives for investors includes:

  • 10 year exemption from income tax for new businesses in designated rural development areas for construction, hotels and restaurants.
  • 2.5 year tax exemption for pioneer industries (must bring beneficial returns to country/new form of industry).
  • There is currently a proposal being prepared for parliament to create a Special Economic Zone for the islands of the Milne Bay Province which will include various tax incentives.

DEVELOPMENT

For a comprehensive guideline to the atoll, download a printable version of the official Investors’ Memorandum below.

DOWNLOAD MEMORANDUM

Environmental

The ecological objectives for the development of the Conflict Islands are …

  • To maintain the natural diversity of the of the atoll’s ecosystem.
  • To maintain the natural beauty of the atoll setting.
  • To avoid the depletion or impairment of any resource of the island on which man, or other organisms inhabiting the atoll depend.

We hope to establish a comprehensive environmentally sustainable development that will have a positive long-term impact on the environment, local communities and resort guests. This affects the design, planning, construction and operation of the resort.

Development will be limited to the largest islands, with the greater majority of the islands being left untouched and protected as nature reserves. The development of the islands will be undertaken using modern sustainable technologies to ensure minimal ecological footprint and be as environmentally responsible as possible.

After a decade of work, the government of Milne Bay Province, Papua New Guinea,passed a law that recognizes community-based marine protected areas and makes it possible to prosecute poachers.
We will instruct all visitors the islands to be careful where they tread, and will institute ‘safe zones’ where people can comfortably wade around in the waters without destroying the reefs.

We will encourage coral reef scientists from around the world to visit the atoll, and establish a monitoring program to determine the presence of fish and coral life and studying how we impact the reef over time.

Alternative-Energy

The natural resources available at The Conflict Islands present the perfect opportunity to move towards a 100% complete renewable energy system. Apart from the immediate local environmental benefits, powering the islands from renewable sources will also allow us to meet our social goals. Most importantly, The Conflict Islands could serve as a case study to show the Papua New Guinea government and local communities that these technologies are cost effective, self-sustainable, and can be implemented thoughtfully to preserve the beautiful landscape of the Louisiade Islands.

We will install low-carbon energy microgrid, consisting of Japanese-made photovoltaic solar cells, wind turbines, Coconut Bio-Diesel Generators, linked to a Sundaya energy storage and distribution system or hydrogen fuel cells for energy storage which negates the problems of lithium batteries.
A Bio-Diesel generator, fuelled by Coconut Bio-Diesel, will be potentially be used as an ecologically and cost-effective fuel supply for power generation to the project. Coconut bio-diesel is an incredible alternative to fossil fuels, and provides the following benefits …

  • Provides sustainable, ecological income to surrounding communities
  • Reduces reliance on imported fossil fuel
  • Produces small scale local electrification
  • Increases local employment
  • Reduces carbon emissions
  • Increases engine mileage
Freehold-Tenure

Freehold land is extremely rare in the South Pacific, and only some 3% of the land of Papua New Guinea is in private hands; privately held under 99-year state lease, or it is held by the State. There is virtually no freehold title. Freehold land is registered with the Registrar of Titles, under the Torrens titling system, exactly the same as Australia.

Whilst freehold land cannot be owned by non-PNG citizens, non-nationals can own freehold property through company structures. Investors will acquire their interest in the freehold title via share interest in the company that owns the freehold. Equitable interest in the freehold in either part or whole of an island will be obtained from either purchase of shares specific to one or all of the islands.

There is no requirement for government approval for transfers of these share interests. Archdale Pty Ltd, a Papua New Guinea company, holds all the shares in the companies that own the islands under freehold title. The 21 islands of the Conflict Group are divided into nine Papua New Guinea companies owning approximately 2 islands each.

Private-Islands

In the very first issue of Fortune Magazine in 1926 Editor Dwight Macdonald wrote… “As a symbol of great possession, the privately owned island may yet supplant even the steamship.” 80 years later steamships weren’t around, but the concept remains.

There is nothing more exclusive and sought after in the world than having your own private island, it becomes effectively you own little kingdom. From Riccardo Montalban’s Fantasy Island to Dr. No’s Crab Key, private islands are exactly that – private. Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman loved the Italian island of Stromboli. Princess Margaret found peace and quiet on the island of Mustique. Richard Branson, Marlon Brando and Malcolm Forbes (whose Laucala Island in Fiji was sold for $10 million) all created their own Private Island Kingdoms for peace, privacy and tranquility.

A private island is one of the best investments money can buy. Buying the right island in the right time and place can be one of the most profitable investments you could ever make. You have not only an affordable retreat for family and friends, but a strategic investment that increases exponentially in value over time.

Colin Tennant, Lord Glenconner bought the 1,400 acre island of Mustique in the Caribbean for £45,000 in 1958, and it is now the playground for the rich and famous. The Conflict Islands in comparison have more than 35 kilometres of sugar-white beaches.

Richard Branson bought Necker Island in 1978 for US$180,000 and spent the next 20 years developing it into his dream home. Today, Necker Island Sir Richard Branson’s Private Island is one of the most luxurious in the world and has been valued at around $106 million.

Just imagine that you had the chance to hop in a time machine to meet Colin Tennant on Mustique Island in 1960, allowing you to buy a piece of tropical beachfront for a pittance? Well the Conflict Islands offer exactly that possibility. Become one of the early entrants to invest in the islands and you can buy not just a beach, but your very own mini Mustique. A tropical island kingdom, surrounded by thousands of metres of sugar white sand, shaded by palms trees dripping into the warm turquoise waters of the lagoon.

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